Lip Service (All surface, No depth)

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I see lots of stuff about curriculum, in fact since the introduction of the EIF (new Ofsted framework) it feels like this is all that we see.

Much of it is shiny, and beautifully designed (it must’ve taken hours). Aesthetically pleasing but with the depth of a thimble.

Knowledge organisers in some places sit at the core as the be-all and end-all of the learning rather than the foundation layer for developing knowledge and understanding.

Quizzing is the new assessment, recall of the facts is all.

Ofsted suggests “Knowing more words makes you smarter” and a thousand vocabulary lists are printed, laminated and sent home before the sentence is even finished.

The current simple view of education seems to be that this will make the difference.

Don’t get me wrong I think curriculum is the answer to practically every question, but I think getting a curriculum right is an on-going complex process. Ask anybody who’s really put in the hours in getting curriculum right for their school and they’ll tell it’s blummin’ tricky.  I truly believe the hours spent developing ‘The What’ are worth every minute.

Engagement is an educational swear-word associated with poor lesson design and poor learning. I’d argue it sits at the core of great learning. I suggest engaged pupils truly remember what they do, we just need to make sure they remember the stuff they need.

Meanwhile we seem intent on stripping ‘The How’ of teaching back to its barest bones. Ignoring the power of good teachers and creating a model that all can deliver. (Maybe that’s what you have to do when you can’t get enough teachers of the quality you want).

Genuinely I feel for young teachers, there is no time to learn. If I were to look back on my formative years in the classroom, they were literally littered with mistakes. I however was lucky, I worked with great people who helped me develop. Do we give the next generation the time to be good. I see lots cast on the scrap-heap without a second glance. There is no time for losers. Be good or be gone. Have we forgotten our responsibility to develop the next generation?

Behaviour is regularly seen as a massive issue in schools. Yet we seem to have forgotten to teach children why and how they should behave. Equally we seem to not bother teaching teachers about classroom management.  Instead we create systems where we wield sanctions like a ‘cane of Damocles’ and all children are expected to behave.  Those who for whatever reason can’t quite reach this halcyon standard are discarded for the ‘Greater Good.’

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‘Think of the 29’ is the clarion call. I don’t disagree that we should remove disruptive children if they are stopping others learning, in-fact I completely believe we should. I also believe we have a responsibility to the 1. How are those children supported…taught. Sadly it seems that some are happy for there to be a few educational casualties cast by the wayside as societal detritus for the benefit of the many. A decision that will come back to haunt those communities forever more.

We seem to have lost our role. Schools should be sat at the heart of a community, increasingly the community is kept at arms length. For all the government’s talk of parents having a greater voice in education, increasingly in this age the voice of the true stakeholders has been mightily diminished.

In our thrust for ‘education’ we seem to be forgetting the role of ‘Schooling’ and the role of Schools.

 

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